10 Native American Influencers And Artists To Follow

With more initiatives being done to recognize Native American land under our feet, Native Americans are turning to social media and art to share their message and redefining what it means to be thankful. From makeup tutorials to everyday advocacy, see what these influencers are doing to share their art and words with the world.

1. Indigenous Goddess Gang 

The Indigenous Goddess Gang consists of a plethora of beautiful, indigenous femmes that share knowledge and medicine through their online platform. It is a space for Indigenous people and acknowledges the land that was taken from them and the cultures they are actively reclaiming: knowledge, identity, and medicine.

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#warriorwomxnwednesday There’s nobody stronger than a single parent. The womxn whom i love & admire for their strength & grace did not get that way because shit worked out. They got that way because shit went wrong, & they handled it. They handled it in a thousand different ways, on a thousand different days, but they handled it. Those womxn are my superheroes.

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This is their project statement:

“As a project which centers indigenous women, we also recognize the crucial work of our queer, trans, two-spirit and non-binary communities, and we acknowledge that we have a lot of work to do; to walk together, to reclaim our knowledge together and to move forward together.” (Indigenous Goddess Gang, About The Goddesses)

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Indigenous Goddess Gang ISSUE 8- As the season is shifting, we acknowledge the need for hibernation and storytelling, to make space to listen to the events of the year and to form our intentions for our journeys to come. We pray and we regroup with our ancestors and relatives and we align our work in our communities, we look at what has been working and what has not. We are accountable for how we may not have been able to show up for our communities, and we learn. We forgive those in our lives that were not able to show up for our communities and we support them to learn. We stand stronger than we ever could have imagined, digging our roots into the soil, practicing gratitude and acknowledging all that has come before us and will come after. We are blessed in all the layers of existing in this place and this time. We are Grateful. This issue of IGG is an acknowledgement to be Grateful, to slow down, to listen, to forgive, to reconnect with the heart and spirit. As we move into the winter, may we all set intentions that will unfold into the spring and beyond. This issue represents the moment of Gratitude before a Rebirth. Shifting out of habits which may have held us back as individuals and communities. We shed these layers that do not serve us any longer and we move forward into spaces of clarity as we prepare for winter and the year to come. Next month our humble publication will be celebrating its 1 Year Anniversary, and as we move into the work and medicine this project will support in the coming year, we are excited to approach a new format which will honor the content in a more in depth and relational way, Indigenous Goddess Gang has some exciting shifts we will be announcing in our next issue! Until then we invite you to experience this issue and join us in Gratitude for all of the Indigenous Goddesses who continue to share their wisdom and to join us in Gratitude to you, the community who continue to support IGG and remind us of the criticality of this type of work, every day. @winstonpaul.co @julianabrowneyesofficial @riseindigenous @awapuhilah @atribecalledbeauty @n5gonzales @coeurdamourr @rowenwhite @razellebenally @native_hearth @blackbelteaglescout

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They have a great, active Instagram that is up to date on all the latest news and issues surrounding Indigenous lifestyle.

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#matriarchmonday reminder from @janeneyazzie & @christypruden

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2. Juliana Brown Eyes 

Juliana is not only known as a photographer and influencer, but she is a bass player for a Native band called “Scatter Their Own.” She is dedicated to exposing native youth and her general community to the world of Native American culture through her art, photography, and words.

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For today's Halloween makeup look I did, Wicahpi Waste Win (Star Woman.) My Mom always told her children that we came from the stars, a Lakota belief that we are sacred spirits from the sky. And when our bodies return to Mother Earth, our spirits will make the journey up the trail of spirits (the milky way) to meet our ancestors and loved ones that have passed before us. Lakota Knowledge holds a wealth of Native ancestral knowledge. Let your babies know, they are beautiful unique spirits from the stars! Also as indigenous people, let's show America that we DO NOT need to appropriate cultures for Halloween by wearing offensive renditions of "The Nobel Savage" or sexualized costumes like "Pocahottie." #Getwoke 🌌✨⭐️🌙 #rezaissancehalloween #lakota #lakotastarknowledge #indigenous

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Your girl out here tho! It’s been my dream to start dancing again, and tonight I made it a reality. For my beadwork I used my Polynesian Tongan designs. Thank you so much to those who helped me throw together my last minute outfit! #OgNaysh2018

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3. Matika Wilbur & Project 562

Matika Wilbur is a member of Swinomish and Tulalip tribes in Washington State and was raised in a family of fishermen. As a photographer, Wilbur worked in education and experienced the lack of resources to teach indigenous knowledge to Native youths.

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Meet 10 year olds, Liana HighEagle and Kiesha Lamere, from the Confederated Tribes of Umatilla, photographed today at Tipi Village, the native camp set up at The Pendleton Roundup, an enormous rodeo in Umatilla Country. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ What was the best part about dancing today? ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ “The five dollars. We’re saving up for the carnival.”

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Her photography projects are dedicated to these kinds of issues she has experienced throughout her life. Project 562 gives homage to over 562 indigenous nations in an effort to provide positive imagery to Native youths and community members.

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We are dressing up like Indians because, “We want to honor Indians”. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ If you wanted to honor Indians you would actually honor them, and there are real ways to do that. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ You would change legislation so that every time our public spaces, “honor our country”, they acknowledged also, that they were on Indigenous land. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ You could show up to protect the Indigenous land that your presence is destroying, by protesting, contributing, donating, signing petitions, canvasing, and becoming an accomplice to the thousands of Natives that have dedicated their lives to protecting Indigenous land. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ You would #changethename. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ You would seek authentic representations of Natives, made by Natives, because representation with out us, is representation done to us. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ If you wanted to honor Indians, you would participate in closing the Indigenous achievement gap in education, and ensure that more than 50% of Indians didn’t drop out of your school district. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ You would buy Indigenous, from Indigenous people, from inspired Natives, not Native inspired. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ If you wanted to honor Indians- you could do something major, and give the land back to an Indian. Deed your property. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ You’d contribute to the missing and murdered Indigenous women movement, and volunteer, search, contribute, and protect the thousands of Indigenous women that are going missing. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ You would teach your children the Indigenous history of the land you are occupying— because EVERYWHERE in North America has an indigenous history, and the “woke”mind, knows that that history is brutal, and that many indigenous lives were taken, so you could “settle” that place. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ You would stop assimilating us. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ You would stop destroying the eco system. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ You’d help restore the habitats and animals that lived here— the salmon, the buffalo, the whales, the wolves, they also deserve to live. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ If you wanted to honor us, you wouldn’t mock us by dressing up like us.

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4. Yéil Ta-Tseen

Or, Nicholas Galanin, takes a multi-media approach to making his art. He combines sculpture, installation, performance, video, photography, and new media. His work addresses issues of authority, authenticity, the Native American experience, and commoditization of Indigenous culture. Often provocative, he also considers the exchange of identity and culture between Native and non-Native communities.

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Congratulations to all involved! The Frances Smyth-Ravenel Prize for Excellence in Publication Design Nevada Museum of Art Unsettled Designed by: Brad Bartlett @nevadaart https://www.aam-us.org/2018/09/28/a-discussion-with-franny-award-winning-designer-brad-bartlett/

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Upcoming solo exhibition opening February of 2019 in Brooklyn, New York … showing new works. https://open-source-gallery.org/nicholas-galanin/

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Gunalchéesh @jilnotjill 🙏🏽 @artnewspaper for the thoughtful review from my retrospective at @heardmuseum 🌊 @nepsidhu

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5. Wendy Red Star

Native American contemporary multimedia and visual artist, Wendy Red Star, often takes a humorous approach to her art. She uses Native American imagery drawn from traditional media to draw her audience in. She confronts romanticized representations of Native American culture in American culture, for instance, headdresses, and reclaims them back to their formal, traditional custom.

http://www.wendyredstar.com/

Peelatchiwaaxpáash / Medicine Crow (Raven) by Wendy Red Star

6. Postcommodity Collective

Comprised of Cristobal Martinez and Kade L. Twist, Postcommodity functions as an Indigenous lenses and voice to engage in “assaultive manifestations of the global market and its supporting institutions, public perceptions, beliefs, and individual actions that comprise ever-expanding, multinational, multiracial, and multiethnic colonizing force defining the 21st Century through ever increasing velocities and complex forms of violence.

Perceptive and enigmatic, Postcommodity has had their art showcased and exhibited at galleries such as the Whitney in New York City.

????SFAI President Knox dreams up a glorious group show featuring works that empower us to change things, like @Postcommodity's "Repellent Fence"

See more? https://t.co/NzXx3R1uAo

Image: "Repellant Fence," 2015. Land art installation. Photo: Michael Lundgren pic.twitter.com/JpVnNRRVKJ

— SFAI (@SFAIofficial) February 8, 2018

"Postcommodity's exhibition seemed designed to evoke the trepidation felt by migrants crossing the border at night." https://t.co/NLLe4FHL5H pic.twitter.com/J3PrAf4Mu7

— Art in America (@ArtinAmerica) July 30, 2017

7. Vision Maker Media 

Primarily creating their own website, the Vision Maker Media focuses on empowering and engaging Native folk to tell and share their stories. Creating a space for Educators, Creators, Filmmakers, and all wanting knowledge on Indigenous issues, Vision Maker Media is a valuable resource.

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Itching for that next #tattoo? Watch Whang Od, almost 100 years old, as she carries on the tattooing traditions of her ancestors in the BRAND NEW 13-part documentary #Skindigenous! Get some ideas by watching the ancient art of Philippine tattooing. If you don't see Skindigenous on your local listings (http://ow.ly/CFYu50ipm9g) , call your stations! Don't miss out! Watch the trailer: http://ow.ly/UnJA50ipm9f

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Who really #discovered America? Oh that’s right, #natives did. Today marks the Inaugural Indigenous People Day in LA, which Los Angeles City Council voted in 2017 to officially replace Columbus Day. Along several other cities, LA is among one of the places, commemorating our true founders.

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>8. Seukteoma

Hon’mana Seukteoma is from Arizona and prides her Youtube channel on speaking about indigenous issues all the while creating a loving and interactive community that informs. She loves giving back to her community and has an Instagram she keeps active on as well.

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#100DaysForNatives Day 1! My name is Hon'mana Seukteoma I'm Tohono O'odham, Hopi and Navajo. I made this photo challenge because there's a bunch of different days to celebrate native identity so why not make it one continuous celebration? On this challenge we'll get to meet new people, share our struggles & triumphs but most importantly celebrate our resilience! Hope you guys have fun with this challenge as we share, learn and grow. • • @bobby_narcho_1 : portrait Joseph Lopez: basket necklace Rafaela Villa : Dress. I:pud Ken Jose Maria : cowhide sandals

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🔮

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This is a great video in response to Non-Native American Youtubers creating Native American tutorials:

9. Natalie Franklin

Avid traveler and mother, Natalie vlogs her travels for all to enjoy. She loves hiking and going on adventures, often following up to her risky, but still fun-to-watch vlogs. Offering a positive and loving space to all her followers and visitors, Natalie has a great connection to nature and shares it with similar-minded people.

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Driving to Page one day I was like “dang, that’d be cool to go up there” later that day I found myself up there. 😉

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10. The 1491’s

To finish our list, these group of creators are known for their tongue-and-cheek humor. The 1491’s are a sketch comedy group based in Minnesota and Oklahoma. From their About Me, they are “chock full of cynicism and splashed with a good dose of indigenous satire.”

Often making sketches about Indigenous culture and/or Indigenous issues, this group is a one-of-a-kind comedy group. Even if you’re not blown away by their jokes, their presence is still great and informing.

 

Source : http://resourcemagonline.com/2018/11/10-native-american-influencers-and-artists-to-follow/94441/