The Whitney’s Warhol Show Strives To Spotlight His Human Side. But It’s His Cynicism That Remains Most Surprising

Why do an Andy Warhol survey right now?

For the Whitney, I assume, that answer is clear-cut: “Andy Warhol: From A to B and Back Again,” the museum’s substantial new show, is a surefire hit for the tourist-hungry institution. Nevertheless, it is to the credit of the Whitney and this show’s curators—Donna De Salvo, Christie Mitchell, and Mark Loiacono—that it does not come off that way, not exactly.

Nothing would be more classically Warholian than simply trotting out the most familiar Greatest Hits, again. His art is by and large about the allure of the popular; he had a low estimation of public’s hunger for the subtleties of art.

“Why don’t they have someone copy it and send the copy, no one would know the difference,” he once quipped when Mona Lisa toured the US in 1963. That cynical aesthetic philosophy is the subtext of 30 Are Better Than One (1964), his silkscreen indifferently repeating the famed Leonardo in washed out monochrome gray and black.

Andy Warhol, <em>30 Are Better Than One</em> (1964). Image courtesy Ben Davis.

Andy Warhol, 30 Are Better Than One (1964). Image courtesy Ben Davis.

Source : https://news.artnet.com/exhibitions/andy-warhol-whitney-review-1400113

The Whitney’s Warhol Show Strives to Spotlight His Human Side. But It’s His Cynicism That Remains Most Surprising
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